UVU Victorian Literature (Fall 2018) Dashboard

Description

This group is a collaborative effort of the members of Utah Valley University's "Victorian Literature" class. It will include a timeline, map, and blog posts related to our course materials. For our timeline, we will place a selection of key political, social, and historical events in conversation with our course texts. Timeline events will be chosen for their relevance to the content and context of our readings. These events will be complemented by a brief blog post/annotation exploring the relationship between literary and cultural history. Our map will help us visualize the spatial relation between our timeline events and course texts. 

Galleries, Timelines, and Maps

There is no content in this group.

Individual Entries

Blog entry
Posted by Ashley Nadeau on Saturday, August 17, 2019 - 16:51

Commonplace books are notebooks or scrapbooks kept by readers and writers to help them reflect upon and remember useful or interesting ideas/concepts. Believed to have originated in the early modern period, commonplace books continued to be popular in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and could contain a variety of writing (and other media), such as: quotes, letters, poems, prayers, journal entries, recipes, images, or even advertisements.

Chronology Entry
Posted by Jillian Innes on Friday, December 14, 2018 - 01:22
Blog entry
Posted by Holly Kelly on Wednesday, December 12, 2018 - 15:19

In the fall of 1883, a pamphlet called, The Bitter Cry of the Outcast London: An Inquiry into the Conditions of the Abject Poor, was published describing the deplorable sanitary conditions of the poor. A few days later, The Pall Mall Gazette picked up the story and wrote an article called “Is it Not Time?” containing a one-page condensed version of the pamphlet. The conditions described included the following quote, “We do not say the conditions of their homes, for how can those places be called homes, compared with the lair of a wild beast would be a comfortable and healthy spot? (57-58)” In heartbreaking detail, the author describes case after case of horrific conditions of filth and degradation.

“In one cellar a sanitary inspector reports finding a father, mother, three children, and four pigs! In another room a missionary found a man ill with small pox, his wife just recovering from her eighth confinement, and the children running...

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Posted by Holly Kelly on Wednesday, December 12, 2018 - 14:42
Chronology Entry
Posted by Holly Kelly on Wednesday, December 12, 2018 - 14:26
Blog entry
Posted by Michaela Jensen on Saturday, December 8, 2018 - 23:33

Only eight years after the second Anglo-Afghan war, Richard Kipling writes The Man Who Would be KIng, which is also located in Afghanistan. Kipling's story is not a retelling of the war, but rather what it represented. Early in the novella Carnehan remarkes that they have "deicided that India isn't big enough for such as us" (9). This attitude reflects the imperialistic attitudes of Victorian England. The British didn't need Afghanistan, but they wanted to keep Russian out and so they started a two year war over it. In their minds, and in Dan and Peachy's, the world belonged to them and nothing was "big enough" for them. The British came in with their 40,000 men and their rifles and the Afghans were run down. During the 1879 Battle of Kabul the "British and Indian casualities were 33 . . . [they] estimated that the Afghan casualties, almost all killed, were 3,000" ("Battle"). Similarly, in the book, Dan and Peachy also come with rifles to save an outnumbered tribe from...

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Chronology Entry
Posted by Michaela Jensen on Saturday, December 8, 2018 - 23:05
Blog entry
Posted by McKaley Clark on Friday, December 7, 2018 - 13:59

 

Through these paintings, you see the shift in the acceptance/tolerance of the Victorians for the “fallen woman”. I think that these paintings also go along well with the readings that we have completed throughout the semester. In Oliver Twist, we have Nancy, the utmost fallen woman. When given the chance for redemption by Rose Maylie, Nancy believes that there is no way for redemption to be possible. Nancy ends up dead at the end of the novel, killed by none other than Bill Sikes. We then shift to Lady Audley’s Secret, a woman who has been married and has disregarded her child to find herself a new life, because she couldn’t handle the pressures of motherhood. Lucy is sent off to an insane asylum at the end of the novel, she doesn't successfully get away with her actions. Lastly, we have Tess of the D’Urbervilles. We see Tess as she struggles with her impregnation. Her family is more accepting and understanding than what was to be expected...

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Chronology Entry
Posted by McKaley Clark on Friday, December 7, 2018 - 13:57
Blog entry
Posted by Michaela Jensen on Friday, December 7, 2018 - 13:41

It is interesting to note that most contemporaries associate theories of evolution with Darwin, when there were others who were talking about evolution and natural selection before him. This is especially important to point for a discussion of "In Memoriam" because Darwin's On the Origin of Species was actually published nine years after Tennyson's poem. Before Darwin's book the more prevalent texts on theories of evolution--both human and the world--were Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology and Robert Chambers Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation. Lyell's book questioned common Christian beliefs of a time of catastrophic change for the Earth, and insetad proposed that the " formation of Earth's crust took place through countless small changes occurring over vast periods of time, all according to known natural laws" ("Charles"). While many of Lyell's suggestions have now been deemed entirely wrong, we can examine the impact that this groundbreaking text would have had on...

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