Oscar Wilde, The Harlot's House

"The Harlot's House" (1885; 1904) suggests why Oscar Wilde came to embody Victorian decadence and aestheticism, not just for his time and place but globally and ever since. This relatively early poem contains many of the aesthetic, political, and philosophical complexities that have come to characterize Wilde and the fin de siècle. This edition of "The Harlot's House" brings together some of the... more

Christina Rossetti, Goblin Market

The title poem of Christina Rossetti’s first commercially published collection of poetry, Goblin Market and Other Poems (Macmillan, 1862), “Goblin Market” has always delighted, perplexed, and inspired readers. A poetic fairytale expressed in deceptively simple form, and imbued with Pre-Raphaelite sensuality and spiritual symbolism, “Goblin Market” met its first public with two... more

Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, first published serially in 1899 and then in book form in 1902, explores with unparalleled intensity the enormity of European imperialism in Africa. A prescient instance of what would become the literary movement known as modernism, the novella also experiments with frame narration and features a complex, highly figurative style. This edition of Heart of... more

In an Artist's Studio

This COVE edition of Christina Rossetti’s “In an Artist’s Studio" will attempt what Dino Franco Felluga, the lead editor, is calling—inspired by Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s “The Sonnet"—a “momentous edition.” The original annotations were assembled during an otherwise ephemeral close-reading session: at the NAVSA/AVSA NYU/Purdue conference at La Pietra in Florence, Italy (May 2017). The collective... more

The Race for Wealth

Charlotte Riddell’s The Race for Wealth, first serialized in Once a Week and published in book form in 1866, revolves around two themes: adulteration and adultery. It is both a business novel, exploring the ambiguities of commerce and trade, and a sensational novel, pushing the boundaries of conventionality. Set in eastern London, the novel is replete with topical... more

About COVE

COVE is The Central Online Victorian Educator, a scholar-driven open-access platform that publishes peer-reviewed Victorian material. It is maintained and supported by NAVSA and a number of independent institutions. Although all peer-reviewed material is open access, we charge a modest amount for use of our tools and the creation of non-peer-reviewed material. If you are interested in getting involved or in supporting the project financially, please contact General Editor Dino Franco Felluga.

General Editor

Dino Franco Felluga, Purdue University