Sample timeline for Joanna Wharton

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A timeline on 19th-century media, technology and culture.

Timeline

Chronological table

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5
Date Event Created by Associated Places
Aug 1858

First attempt at transatlantic cable

In August, 1858, to riotous celebrations in the United States, in which fireworks destroyed the cupola of New York’s City Hall, the first cable was successfully completed between Valentia, Ireland and Trinity Bay, Newfoundland, only to cease functioning within a month.

Articles

John M. Picker, “Threads across the Ocean: The Transatlantic Telegraph Cable, July 1858, August 1866″

Jul 1866

Permanent transatlantic cable established

In July 1866, in the aftermath of the Civil War, a permanent transatlantic cable was re-established after a failed attempt in 1858.

Articles

John M. Picker, “Threads across the Ocean: The Transatlantic Telegraph Cable, July 1858, August 1866″

1 Jul 1874

Sholes & Glidden Type-Writer on sale

Sholes and Glidden TypewriterThe first mass-manufactured examples of the Sholes & Glidden Type-Writer went on sale in the major cities of the United States on 1 July 1874. Looking very much like a sewing machine, complete with a foot-treadle to operate the carriage return, decorative flowers stenciled on its glossy black metal enclosure, and the words “Sholes & Glidden Type-Writer” etched in gilt, the machine was widely considered a mechanical wonder and drew large crowds at the fairs and exhibitions where it was demonstrated. Image: The Sholes and Glidden Typewriter. From Clarence Charles Smith, The Expert Typist (New York: The Macmillan Company, 1922), p. 4. This image is in the public domain in the United States as its copyright has expired.

Articles

Christopher Keep, “The Introduction of the Sholes & Glidden Type-Writer, 1874″

Related Articles

Arlene Young, “The Rise of the Victorian Working Lady: The New-Style Nurse and the Typewriter, 1840-1900″

20 Feb 1896

Theatrograph

screen shot from Paul filmOn 20 February 1896, Robert W. Paul exhibits his moving-image projection, the “Theatrograph,” at Finsbury Technical College in London. This was the most successful British equivalent of the French film projector, dubbed the “Cinématographe.” The Cinématographe was exhibited the previous year, 1895, by Auguste and Louis Lumière. Paul’s machine was later renamed the “Animatograph.” Image: Screenshot from Robert W. Paul's film Blackfriars Bridge (1896), exhibited at the Alhambra Music Hall in Leicester Square in 1896. This image is in the public domain in the United States because its copyright has expired.

Article

Garrett Stewart, "Curtain Up on Victorian Popular Cinema; Or, The Critical Theater of the Animatograph"

25 Mar 1896

Animatograph

screen shot from Paul filmOn 25 March 1896, Robert W. Paul exhibits his moving-image projection, renamed the “Animatograph,” at the Alhambra Music Hall in Leicester Square. This moving-image projector was originally named the “Theatograph” at an earlier unveiling on 20 February 1896. Paul’s machine was the most successful British equivalent of the French film projector, dubbed the “Cinématographe.” The Cinématographe was exhibited the previous year, 1895, by Auguste and Louis Lumière. Image: Screenshot from Robert W. Paul's film Blackfriars Bridge (1896), exhibited at the Alhambra Music Hall in Leicester Square in 1896. This image is in the public domain in the United States because its copyright has expired.

Articles

Garrett Stewart, "Curtain Up on Victorian Popular Cinema; Or, The Critical Theater of the Animatograph"