Engaging English (F21 ENGL 20200-002 Purdue) Dashboard

Description

image of surfingThis class will teach you how to surf (the Internet) and about the various ways that English studies have been transformed over the last few decades.  Starting with some basic close-reading and analysis skills (aided by annotation at COVE Studio), we will then explore how those skills have been increasingly applied to new areas of inquiry (tv, film, culture, critical theory, and politics).  Throughout, we will employ new digital tools that change the way we approach our subjects of inquiry, including Web annotation, timeline-building, gallery-building and GIS mapping.  As we proceed, we will consider the nature of English studies:  What is an English department and how does it relate to the rest of the university?  What can you do with an English degree?  Why is it necessary to fight for English in an increasingly STEM-oriented world?  

See below, "Galleries, Timelines, and Maps," in order to add items to our collective map, timeline and gallery exhibit. Click on the links below to begin.

Galleries, Timelines, and Maps

Map
Posted by Payton Anderson on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 23:01

In July of 1848, the first women’s rights convention was held in Seneca Falls, New York.  The convention had only been advertised one week before it started in the Seneca County Courier.  It was advertised as “a convention to discuss the social, civil and religious condition and rights of Women.”  It also stated that “during the first day, the meeting will be exclusively for Women, which all are earnestly invited to attend.  The public generally are invited to be present on the second day.”  Even though there was very little publicity on this major event in history, there was about 300 attendees, but most of them lived locally.  Elizabeth Cady Stanton was the convention’s organizer.  This was where she gave her first public speech.  Her speech provided insight to what the convention’s goals and purpose was.  Her speech stated that they protest “to declare our right to be as free as a man is free.”  Elizabeth Cady Stanton also discussed the Declaration of Sentiments.  The...

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Chronology
Posted by Payton Anderson on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 22:39

The 19th Amendment states that all American women are given the right to vote.  The 19th Amendment was approved by the Senate on June 4th, 1919 and ratified in August 1920.  Years before the amendment was even brought to the government, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott organized the first women's right convention in July of 1848.  This convention overall came with a list of demands for women.  This list of demands was called the Declaration of Sentiments and it called for, broader education and professional opportunities for women and the right of married women to control their wages and property.  Women's voting rights were not discussed at this convention, but it soon became a large issue in women's rights.  A large majority of the attendees at the convention were abolitionists and their goal was the right to vote for all.  This goal was only partially recognized when the 15th amendment was passed in 1870.  This amendment gave black men who were American...

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Chronology
Posted by Sydney Altman on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 22:26

This chronology discusses Betty Friedan and the impact her novel The Feminine Mystique caused on the Women's Movement. 

Map
Posted by Lora Fernandez on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 21:08

Ruby Bridges was born during the unfortunate time in which people continued to avidly believe in the concept of “Separate but equal”.  Even though the Supreme Court already came to a “desegregating schools” consensus during Brown v. Board of Education, there were still many people who were hesitant or not in support of this. When Ruby was around the age of 6, she was asked to take a test that would determine if she could attend a white school in New Orleans. These tests were made to be highly difficult to filter out the African Americans from white schools. However, despite the odds, Ruby passed the test and was told she would be able to go to school at William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Despite the initial order that Ruby was to attend school at William Frantz, there were many tactics used to push this back. However, in November, Ruby was finally able to attend school in New Orleans. With a tremendous amount of security and government supervision,...

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Chronology
Posted by Lora Fernandez on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 21:02

After the world faced the great tragedy of losing Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., many people questioned the high leverage the social justice movement once had. As America lost one of its greatest spokes people, who fought day and night against racism, it seemed as though people could only continue to live on through his legacy in order to maintain his efforts. On April 5, 1968, the day after MLK was shot and killed, a women by the name of Jane Elliot decided she would partake in maintaining the voice of Martin Luther King Jr.

In an all-white town in Riceville, Iowa, Elliott grouped up all of her third-grade students to discuss the new rules of her class. She proceeded to tell them that people with brown eyes were better than people with blue eyes. She segregated the class with this new notion. In addition to this arbitrary claim, Elliot ensured that the blue-eyed people were not allowed to play at recess, and they were also to be looked and talked down upon. The brown-...

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Map
Posted by Lauren Fitch on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 15:24

South Carolina has a long, violent, and racist history, effectively setting a morbid backdrop for the events that unfolded on June 17, 2015. The Charleston shooting occurred in a church named the Emanuel African Methodist Episocopal Church (A.M.E.) The church had become somewhat of a hub for social justice and political activism. Denmark Vesey was one of the founders of the church and used it as a homebase for what the National Park Service describes as, “an enslaved insurrection” against slave-owners and both city and state officials. Douglas R. Egerton continues the story by describing how the city eventually destroyed the church, only for it to be rebuilt by Vesey’s son Robert. Then, when an earthquake struck Charleston in the 1880s, members of the church helped to rebuild and repair damages to it (“Before Charleston’s Shooting, a Long History of Attacks”). 

In more recent times, the church community...

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Chronology
Posted by Lauren Fitch on Tuesday, November 16, 2021 - 17:01

In South Carolina in 2012, a 21-year-old white man named Dylann Roof shot and killed nine people.  The shooting was in Charleston at a Black church, and all nine victims were Black church-goers.  Roof sat with the victims and other members for over an hour studying the Bible before he pulled out a gun and began the massacre.  Brent C. Talbot quotes Dylann Roof who, when prompted by victim Tywanza Sanders before his death, stated, “‘I have to do it. You rape our women and you’re taking over our country. And you have to go’” (Talbot 2). 

News outlets such as CNN and Fox News heavily covered the attack in the days that followed the murders.  This is important to note because news networks give information to millions of Americans with certain, subtle undertones and narratives.  Roof had (and still has) an intensely racist background; however, this can be overshadowed or outright ignored based on how news...

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Map
Posted by Isaiah Koeninger on Wednesday, November 10, 2021 - 02:56

Formerly known as Blackwell's Island and later Welfare Island, Roosevelt Island is a very small island in New York City's East River. It measures only .23 square miles in area. Though it is small, this island has an important history associated with it, one of mistreatment and a significant amount of pain. This small island was purchased in 1828. Just four years later, in 1832, a penitentiary was built. This created a physical barrier between the prisoners and the mainland. Strangely, this island wasn't just for criminals. Instead, there were also workhouses, an almshouse, a general hospital, and a hospital for those deemed "incurables". The island was also home to a smallpox hospital for a brief time. The people referred to as "incurables" at the time were those that had chronic and/or severe conditions that were not likely to be cured. This category included those with mental and/or physical disabilities as well as those with mental illnesses. In 1839, the New York City Lunatic...

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Gallery Exhibit
Posted by Dino Franco Felluga on Tuesday, August 24, 2021 - 13:06

course logoThis timeline is part of ENGL 202's build assignment. Research a topic that teaches us something about race, class, gender, or sexuality and then contribute what you have learned to our shared class resource. As the assignment states, "Add one timeline element, one map element and one gallery image about race, class, gender, or sex to our collective resources in COVE Editions. Provide images, sources and sufficient detail to explain the historical or cultural element that you are presenting. Interlink the three objects." A few timeline elements have already been added (borrowing from BRANCH). 

Map
Posted by Dino Franco Felluga on Tuesday, August 24, 2021 - 13:01

course logoThis timeline is part of ENGL 202's build assignment. Research a topic that teaches us something about race, class, gender, or sexuality and then contribute what you have learned to our shared class resource. As the assignment states, "Add one timeline element, one map element and one gallery image about race, class, gender, or sex to our collective resources in COVE Editions. Provide images, sources and sufficient detail to explain the historical or cultural element that you are presenting. Interlink the three objects." A few timeline elements have already been added (borrowing from BRANCH). 

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Individual Entries

Posted by Liz Currie on Thursday, November 18, 2021 - 02:45
Place
Posted by Liz Currie on Thursday, November 18, 2021 - 02:30

The San Francisco Federal Building is home to the regional office of what was formerly known as the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW). Now this department has been separated into the Department of Health and Human Services, and the Department of Education. The regional office of the Department of Education still resides at this address. From April 5th to April 30th of 1977, this building was host to the longest sit in of a federal building in US history. The protestors went there to talk to the regional director of the HEW offices in San Francisco and ask him about the status of the enabling regulations for Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. director Maldonado had never heard of Section 504 before, nor had any of his staff. 75 protestors refused to leave the HEW offices that night. Their numbers grew to 110 on the second night, and 125 by the third. They persevered for 25 days, until Secretary Califano finally signed the enabling regulations more than 3...

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Chronology Entry
Posted by Liz Currie on Thursday, November 18, 2021 - 01:45
Chronology Entry
Posted by Liz Currie on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 23:56
Posted by Payton Anderson on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 23:28
Place
Posted by Michael Yaeger on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 23:23

The manufacturing of cars was an important trait of defining Flint, Michigan. In 1937, Workers occupied different aspects of the manufacturing process for 44 days while threatened by the National Guard troops and hired thugs (Rosner). The autoworkers strike in Flint emphasized the broader national discontent of labor workers, “It also was a signature strike by the growing ranks of industrial workers’ organizing drives,” (Rosner 200). The workers' strike mirrored most union strikes as they wanted to be paid better while working less hours, health benefits and better working conditions. While the workers won a labor victory, the impact of the various chemicals used in the manufacturing process on the environment were inescapable. Flint being focused on the financial prosperity of the city and its people in 1937 acted with little regard for the environment, “Huge amounts of lead and other...

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Place
Posted by Payton Anderson on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 23:03
Chronology Entry
Posted by Michael Yaeger on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 23:01
Chronology Entry
Posted by Sydney Altman on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 22:37
Chronology Entry
Posted by Sydney Altman on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 22:33

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