UVU Victorian Literature (Fall 2019) Dashboard

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Description

This group is a collaborative effort of the members of Utah Valley University's, Fall 2019 "Victorian Literature" class. As a class, we will be exploring the material culture of the Victorian Era. Each class member will be responsible for identifying an object of interest in one of our course texts. After identifying their chosen object, they will research its history, pursuing how this object was produced, advertised, traded, used, and discarded during the nineteenth century. Following their research, each member will contribute posts to the class gallery, timeline, and map (as appropriate per object). Once they've contributed to the class's digital archive, members will present their findings to the class and write a short reflection on how their findings enrich their reading of the text in which they discovered their object. By tracing the material history of an individual object, each member will gain a deeper appreciation for nineteenth-century material culture and its relationship to the Victorian literary imagination. 

Galleries, Timelines, and Maps

Blog entry
Posted by Mikayla Morganson on Friday, October 11, 2019 - 20:22

Holland Cloth is what Jane Eyre's pinafore is made of. Holland is a cheap material and another signifier of class. Lowerclass youth wear pinafores made out of fabric like holland, higherclass children wear pinafores made out of nicer fabrics. Here is a short article on Holland fabric.

Holland, plainwoven unbleached or dull-finish linen used as furniture covering or a cotton fabric that is made more or less opaque by a glazed or unglazed finish (called the Holland finish), consisting of oil and a filling material. Originally the name was applied to any fine, plainwoven linens imported from the continent of Europe, and especially to the product obtained from the Netherlands.

Holland is used for window shades, insulation, labels and tags, sign cloth, and the like. In Greece a number of coloured cotton fabrics are also known as hollands.

Gallery Exhibit
Posted by Karli Frandsen on Wednesday, October 9, 2019 - 12:34

A guide to coaches and carriages in the noves "Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Bronte.

Blog entry
Posted by Karli Frandsen on Wednesday, October 9, 2019 - 12:29

Shows the cost of a coach (Again Dickens Public Transportation in his novels)

http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/dickens/reviews/grossman.html

Blog entry
Posted by Karli Frandsen on Wednesday, October 9, 2019 - 12:26

This is a book that is a comprehensive guide to carriages, coaches, stagecoaches and other forms of transportation published 1974, 1975 London. 

https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/a-treatise-on-carriages

Chronology
Posted by Karli Frandsen on Wednesday, October 9, 2019 - 11:46

The Liverpool and Manchester Railway, which opened in 1830, was the first modern railroad. It was a public carrier of both passengers and freight.

https://www.britannica.com/topic/British-Railways

Chronology
Posted by SARAH BARTHOLOMEW on Wednesday, September 11, 2019 - 12:10

 The Opium Wars 1839-1869

Map
Posted by Ashley Nadeau on Saturday, August 17, 2019 - 19:04

This map will include locations related to our course texts and the objects each class member has chosen for their material culture research project. 

Gallery Exhibit
Posted by Ashley Nadeau on Saturday, August 17, 2019 - 19:02

This gallery will include images related to the objects each class member has chosen for their material culture research project. 

Chronology
Posted by Ashley Nadeau on Saturday, August 17, 2019 - 17:28

This timeline will include historic events related to our course texts and the objects each class member has chosen for their material culture research project. 

Pages

Individual Entries

Blog entry
Posted by Chauncey Singleton on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 12:19

There were a series of laws in the Victorian English legal system known as the "Bloody Code". This name was derived from the fact that there were a huge number of crimes for which the death penalty could be imposed. 

In 1815 the number of crimes that carried the death penatly was 215! Some of the most interesting of those were: 

  • murder
  • arson
  • forgery
  • cutting down trees
  • stealing horses or sheep
  • destroying turnpike roads
  • stealing from a rabbit warren
  • pickpocketing goods worth a shilling (roughly $39 today)
  • being out at night with a blackened face
  • being an unmarried mother concealing a stillborn child
  • stealing from a shipwreck
  • wrecking a fishpond

The lawmakers of the time though that these laws would act as a deterrent. It was thought that people might not commit crimes if they knew that they could be sentenced to death. This was also the reason...

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Posted by Chauncey Singleton on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 12:08
Posted by Chauncey Singleton on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 12:06
Posted by Chauncey Singleton on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 12:05
Posted by Chauncey Singleton on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 12:03
Posted by Chauncey Singleton on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 12:01
Posted by Chauncey Singleton on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 12:00
Posted by Chauncey Singleton on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 11:58
Posted by Chauncey Singleton on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 11:57
Posted by Chauncey Singleton on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 11:56

Pages