UVU Victorian Literature (Fall 2019) Dashboard

Description

This group is a collaborative effort of the members of Utah Valley University's, Fall 2019 "Victorian Literature" class. As a class, we will be exploring the material culture of the Victorian Era. Each class member will be responsible for identifying an object of interest in one of our course texts. After identifying their chosen object, they will research its history, pursuing how this object was produced, advertised, traded, used, and discarded during the nineteenth century. Following their research, each member will contribute posts to the class gallery, timeline, and map (as appropriate per object). Once they've contributed to the class's digital archive, members will present their findings to the class and write a short reflection on how their findings enrich their reading of the text in which they discovered their object. By tracing the material history of an individual object, each member will gain a deeper appreciation for nineteenth-century material culture and its relationship to the Victorian literary imagination. 

Galleries, Timelines, and Maps

Gallery Exhibit
Posted by Chauncey Singleton on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 11:33

This gallery has a collection of images related to the gibbet, gibbet-cages, and hangings in general. 

Gallery Exhibit
Posted by Katrina DeKarver on Monday, November 4, 2019 - 13:37

Possible contents in a medicine chest or on Lady Audley's boudoir.

Here is a medical journal with medical chest suggestions: https://archive.org/details/b28098109/page/328

Chronology
Posted by Paige Melton on Saturday, November 2, 2019 - 13:31

Cigars began being manufacted in Britian in 1820

Gallery Exhibit
Posted by Paige Melton on Saturday, November 2, 2019 - 13:26

Various Cigar Ad's from the Victorian Era

Chronology
Posted by Natalie Evjen on Monday, October 28, 2019 - 23:55

Date when telegraph cables were connected from North America to England 

Chronology
Posted by Natalie Evjen on Friday, October 25, 2019 - 00:12

The first commercial telegraph system in the U.K. was pioneered by William Fothergill Cooke, a British inventor, and Charles Wheatstone, a British scientist. Euston and Camden Town were the original towns connected, and the first message was sent July 25, 1837. 

Gallery Exhibit
Posted by Karli Frandsen on Wednesday, October 9, 2019 - 12:34

A guide to coaches and carriages in the noves "Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Bronte.

Chronology
Posted by Karli Frandsen on Wednesday, October 9, 2019 - 11:46

The Liverpool and Manchester Railway, which opened in 1830, was the first modern railroad. It was a public carrier of both passengers and freight.

https://www.britannica.com/topic/British-Railways

Chronology
Posted by SARAH BARTHOLOMEW on Wednesday, September 11, 2019 - 12:10

 The Opium Wars 1839-1869

Map
Posted by Ashley Nadeau on Saturday, August 17, 2019 - 19:04

This map will include locations related to our course texts and the objects each class member has chosen for their material culture research project. 

Pages

Individual Entries

Chronology Entry
Posted by Chancellor Carter on Sunday, December 1, 2019 - 21:04
Blog entry
Posted by Chancellor Carter on Sunday, December 1, 2019 - 20:50

Tess of the D’urbervilles

Chapter 47

“a timber-framed construction, with straps and wheels appertaining—the threshing-machine which, whilst it was going, kept up a despotic demand upon the endurance of their muscles and nerves. 

A little way off there was another indistinct figure; this one black, with a sustained hiss that spoke of strength very much in reserve. The long chimney running up beside an ash-tree, and the warmth which radiated from the spot, explained without the necessity of much daylight that here was the engine which was to act as the primum mobile of this little world. By the engine stood a dark, motionless being, a sooty and grimy embodiment of tallness, in a sort of trance, with a heap of coals by his side: it was the engine-man.”

Chronology Entry
Posted by Chancellor Carter on Sunday, December 1, 2019 - 20:48
Posted by Chancellor Carter on Sunday, December 1, 2019 - 20:32
Posted by Chancellor Carter on Sunday, December 1, 2019 - 20:29
Posted by Chancellor Carter on Sunday, December 1, 2019 - 20:24
Posted by Chancellor Carter on Sunday, December 1, 2019 - 20:24
Posted by Chauncey Singleton on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 16:41
Posted by Chauncey Singleton on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 16:41
Blog entry
Posted by Chauncey Singleton on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 12:22

"The Criminal Law Consolidation Act of 1861 reduced the number of capital crimes to four, murder, high treason, piracy and arson in a Royal Dockyard, (this was a separate offence, not high treason).  In reality, except for four executions for attempted murder, this act was more of a tidying up exercise as nobody else had been hanged for a crime other than for murder since 1837.

The 1864 Royal Commission on Capital Punishment sat for two years and concluded that there was no case for abolition of the death penalty but did recommend ending public executions. (Franz Muller, above, was hanged whilst the committee was sitting).

In the Spring of 1868, England and Scotland carried out their last public executions.  In Wales, the last one had been two years earlier when 18 year old Robert Coe was executed outside Cardiff prison on the 12th of April 1866 for the murder of John Davies.  Joseph Bell became the last person to die in full public in...

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Pages